I fully support the NHS and am proud to be able to work as an NHS doctor, when time permits.

As such, I want to see it getting all the funding it needs in the years ahead.

How to fund the NHS in the long-term is one of the most pressing and potent political issues facing the country. Demand for the NHS only continues to rise, and as the population ages, there are a growing number of widespread chronic conditions which will be increasingly expensive and challenging to address, without a credible and effective plan to fund the NHS and social care.

As I am sure you are aware, the Prime Minister recently announced the Government's intention to provide the NHS with an additional £20.5 billion by 2023/24. This new investment is extremely welcome, and I hope you agree it demonstrates the Government's commitment to properly funding our NHS and public services.

Alongside this, the NHS is expected to come up with a ten-year plan to demonstrate how it will continue to improve patient care, offer world-class services, and increase productivity, which is so important in a taxpayer funded healthcare system. This will be further supported by a £10 billion programme of capital investment, to help the NHS build world-class infrastructure, as well as additional support for social care services.

While the details of how this funding will be provided will be unveiled by the Chancellor, I hope I can assure you that I fully support and will continue to champion further increases in funding for the NHS, by raising taxes if need be, to ensure it has the investment it needs, and is financially sustainable in the long run.

As I say, I fully support the NHS, and want to see it fully funded, and delivering world-class treatment to patients.


Contact Dr Dan Poulter

Click here to contact Dan

Dr Dan's work in Parliament

Mental Health: Assessment — [Joan Ryan in the Chair] (22 Jan 2019)
Daniel Poulter: I thank the hon. Lady for giving way; she is being very kind. In relation to getting a full picture of suicidality, there are sometimes protective factors that stop people wanting to take their own life. For example, they may have children. There may be other factors in their life that mean that they would not want to go through with the act of ending their life, even though they are having...

Mental Health: Assessment — [Joan Ryan in the Chair] (22 Jan 2019)
Daniel Poulter: I am sympathetic to a number of the points the hon. Lady makes, although, for an experienced medical professional, one component of assessing somebody who is unwell is looking at how they appear, because that may be a symptom of distress, self-neglect or other issues, notwithstanding the points she has made. One of the challenges she raised is that of those patients with fluctuating...